Collision Detection Glasses for the Blind (EXRAY Glasses)

Design Brief

Helping the blind to navigate the changing world around them.

Self-Defined Project   |    2019

Introduction:

Design & Features

Easy to use, affordable, and functional.

The glasses notify blind users about any objects they are going to collide with. 

Using 2 cameras, the glasses can detect objects in front of the user’s 180° field of view. 

Vibration motors provide haptic feedback and only in the direction of the object detected.

“Be careful there is an object approaching your left.” 

Voice commands warn and alert the user using the integrated speakers. 

INTEGRATED SPEAKERS

THEE ARE ALSO 2 RE-MAPPABLE BUTTONS ON THE RIGHT SIDE

TEXTURED RUBBER SQUEEZE BUTTON

TEXTURED RUBBER SLIDER BUTTON

Users can connect to their smartphone and re-map all buttons on the glasses to specific commands.  

TEXTURED CARRYING CASE FOR EASY GRIP

LID CUT OUT ALLOWS BLIND USERS TO EASILY OPEN THE CASE

The glasses magnetically attach and charge inside the carrying case. The carrying case has an internal battery that can charge the glasses through wireless charging. 

CARRYING CASE

CHARGING DOCK

To charge the case, blind users can magnetically attach the case (with the glasses inside) to the dock. Users can charge the glasses overnight and charge the glasses on the go.

Concept Development

I developed and explored multiple concepts through sketching and rapid prototyping. 

I tested the dimensions and overall size of the frames. The electronics components need to fit inside and it was important to determine dimensions that won’t make the glasses bulky and uncomfortable.

Sketch modelling allowed me to explore various different shapes and forms quickly.  

Testing the positioning of the buttons and sensors.

I explored different shapes and forms for the buttons.

It was important to use a shape and form that blind users can easily feel and ergonomically use.   

Material Selection

It was important to use materials that made the glasses durable, lightweight, affordable, and comfortable. 

Material: Rubber 

The buttons can be easily pressed and identified with the help of the texture and matte finish. 

Finish: Matte Textured Pattern 

Frame:

Material: Nylon (Polyamid) 

The glasses will be durable while, reducing manufacturing costs. The overall structure will be lightweight and the smooth surface of the frame won’t irritate users with Metal allergies. 

Finish: Glossy 

Lens:

Material: Polycarbonate 

The lens will be lighter than glass and will be safer when it cracks. 

Finish: Glossy 

Temple Tips:

Material: Silicone

With the silicone, the glasses comfortably sit on the ears. The material is lightweight, and users who have metal allergies will prefer this material.

Finish: Matte Textured Hexagon Pattern 

Buttons:

Polished Aluminium

Other materials explored:

I experimented using polished aluminum as the material for the frame. However, I decided to avoid all metal materials. The weight of the internal electronics and components combined with a metal frame would make it too heavy and uncomfortable. Some users also have allergies to certain metals.   

Prototyping

I prototyped electronic circuits to test the technology and the haptic feedback system.

Prototyping Process:

I made multiple circuits and electronics layouts and determined how much space is required for the internal hardware of the glasses. 

This video shows how the IR sensors detected my hand and vibrated the motor. The motors seem loud although, could be reduced to mimic a light tap. (Sound On)

These were the final iterations of the circuits and electronics. I used these dimensions and updated my CAD models and physical prototypes of the glasses. 

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© Omer Ali 2019.